Taís da Costa
Taís da Costa

New media artist, story collector, art hive facilitator

Originally from Brazil, Taís has a Studio Arts BFA from Concordia University and explores many mediums including ceramics, silkscreen, drawing, and video art.
Taís has been involved in the Native Immigrant collective since its birth in 2013. Bringing a young perspective, she has worked on making the collective’s work more accessible through digital content: video and photography documentation, the creation of a website and social network to share the work, and the current production of a web documentary and virtual reality interactive space.
She is responsible for conceiving and facilitating the monthly Native Immigrant Art Hives, a free community art studio open to all.

Nico Williams
Nico Williams

Beadwork artist and cultural interpreter

Nico Williams is a new media, beadwork artist who resides in Montreal, Quebec. He is Anishnaabe, Ojibwe, from Aamjiwnaang, which means “where the water flows spiritually like a braid.” He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts focusing on print media from Concordia University. Willams began experimenting with beadwork in 2015 using Japanese glass delicas, natural materials and seed beads. His use of beads explores a variety of Ojibwe fancy craft-work practices. He has actively been focusing on the revitalization and evolution of traditional Ojibwe fine crafts. The beadwork he creates is a deep reflection of love and respect for the beauty and rich visual treasures in nature that surround us. Using traditional practice, as well as contemporary influence, Williams explores the decorative impact of space, colour, and movement. He has exhibited his works across Canada and internationally.

Kalynn Sinnamon
Kalynn Sinnamon

Painter and link to the Ontarian community

Kalynn is an emerging artist and graduate of Ontario College of Art and Design. Her artistic practice explores the contrast between infrastructure and high areas of virtually untouched wilderness, and often what happens when they connect. Identity and relationships with the land are explored in many forms. Embedded in this is both the cultivation of understanding of Indigenous people on Turtle Island, and her personal story and history and the narrative that is formed within. Her process of reconciliation is very close to her heart and greatly informs her art making. She started her collaboration with Native Immigrant in 2015 during the dressmaking and beadwork exhibition “Teiotiohkwenhahton: Visions of Peace.”

“There is no one shared Canadian experience. But reaching out to our cousins and neighbours, we can begin to forge trust and mutual experience, bridge communities and create collaborative, emerging and informative artistic expressions of this connection.”

Diego Ugalde De Haene
Diego Ugalde De Haene

Cultural and Research Consultant

Diego Ugalde De Haene is a puppeteer and a poet. Through his Compañia Banyan de Marionetas he has built bridges across cultures using ancient oriental marionette techniques to tell modern stories. For more than 15 years he has been telling stories, specializing in shadow puppet theatre. For the last few years, he has devoted himself to research and revitalization of native culture and languages. He is a member of Native Immigrant as a cultural and research consultant, as well as helping to establish links between Mexico and Montreal. Though based in Amealco, Mexico, he plans to come to Montreal as many times as possible to keep up his work and research around corn culture in the Americas.

Carolina Echeverria
Carolina Echeverria

Founder of Native Immigrant, Mentor for the Emerging Artists NI Collective

Carolina is an artist, storyteller and the creator of a powerful relationship with words.  Carolina is no stranger to controversy: her exhibits have always challenged social norms. Carolina believes in the power of a woman to change the current of perception in today’s world. A stranger in a strange land, she has adapted to a new culture while protecting her true self from its divisive politics.

Carolina has been working on an artistic statement of collective cultural values since 2010. As an artist, she seeks to bridge immigrants and First Nations, to talk about the space between Native and Immigrant by inserting a hyphen—a symbol of what holds us all together, to preserve the space in which dialogue, creativity, and true healing can occur.

Taís da Costa
Nico Williams
Kalynn Sinnamon
Diego Ugalde De Haene
Carolina Echeverria
Taís da Costa

New media artist, story collector, art hive facilitator

Originally from Brazil, Taís has a Studio Arts BFA from Concordia University and explores many mediums including ceramics, silkscreen, drawing, and video art.
Taís has been involved in the Native Immigrant collective since its birth in 2013. Bringing a young perspective, she has worked on making the collective’s work more accessible through digital content: video and photography documentation, the creation of a website and social network to share the work, and the current production of a web documentary and virtual reality interactive space.
She is responsible for conceiving and facilitating the monthly Native Immigrant Art Hives, a free community art studio open to all.

Nico Williams

Beadwork artist and cultural interpreter

Nico Williams is a new media, beadwork artist who resides in Montreal, Quebec. He is Anishnaabe, Ojibwe, from Aamjiwnaang, which means “where the water flows spiritually like a braid.” He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts focusing on print media from Concordia University. Willams began experimenting with beadwork in 2015 using Japanese glass delicas, natural materials and seed beads. His use of beads explores a variety of Ojibwe fancy craft-work practices. He has actively been focusing on the revitalization and evolution of traditional Ojibwe fine crafts. The beadwork he creates is a deep reflection of love and respect for the beauty and rich visual treasures in nature that surround us. Using traditional practice, as well as contemporary influence, Williams explores the decorative impact of space, colour, and movement. He has exhibited his works across Canada and internationally.

Kalynn Sinnamon

Painter and link to the Ontarian community

Kalynn is an emerging artist and graduate of Ontario College of Art and Design. Her artistic practice explores the contrast between infrastructure and high areas of virtually untouched wilderness, and often what happens when they connect. Identity and relationships with the land are explored in many forms. Embedded in this is both the cultivation of understanding of Indigenous people on Turtle Island, and her personal story and history and the narrative that is formed within. Her process of reconciliation is very close to her heart and greatly informs her art making. She started her collaboration with Native Immigrant in 2015 during the dressmaking and beadwork exhibition “Teiotiohkwenhahton: Visions of Peace.”

“There is no one shared Canadian experience. But reaching out to our cousins and neighbours, we can begin to forge trust and mutual experience, bridge communities and create collaborative, emerging and informative artistic expressions of this connection.”

Diego Ugalde De Haene

Cultural and Research Consultant

Diego Ugalde De Haene is a puppeteer and a poet. Through his Compañia Banyan de Marionetas he has built bridges across cultures using ancient oriental marionette techniques to tell modern stories. For more than 15 years he has been telling stories, specializing in shadow puppet theatre. For the last few years, he has devoted himself to research and revitalization of native culture and languages. He is a member of Native Immigrant as a cultural and research consultant, as well as helping to establish links between Mexico and Montreal. Though based in Amealco, Mexico, he plans to come to Montreal as many times as possible to keep up his work and research around corn culture in the Americas.

Carolina Echeverria

Founder of Native Immigrant, Mentor for the Emerging Artists NI Collective

Carolina is an artist, storyteller and the creator of a powerful relationship with words.  Carolina is no stranger to controversy: her exhibits have always challenged social norms. Carolina believes in the power of a woman to change the current of perception in today’s world. A stranger in a strange land, she has adapted to a new culture while protecting her true self from its divisive politics.

Carolina has been working on an artistic statement of collective cultural values since 2010. As an artist, she seeks to bridge immigrants and First Nations, to talk about the space between Native and Immigrant by inserting a hyphen—a symbol of what holds us all together, to preserve the space in which dialogue, creativity, and true healing can occur.

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